Bio & Headshots

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Gregory Samantha Rosenthal (they/them or she/her) is Associate Professor of History and Coordinator of the Public History Concentration at Roanoke College in Salem, Virginia. She is the author of two books, Beyond Hawaiʻi: Native Labor in the Pacific World (University of California Press, 2018) and Living Queer History: Remembrance and Belonging in a Southern City (forthcoming from UNC Press). They have additionally authored half a dozen journal articles and over twenty additional written works. Samantha is co-founder of the Southwest Virginia LGBTQ+ History Project, a queer public history initiative based in Roanoke, Virginia. Her work, as an author and with the History Project, has been recognized with awards and honorable mentions from the National Council on Public History, the Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History, the American Society for Environmental History, and the Working Class Studies Association. She currently serves on the Governing Board of the Committee on Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender History, and previously served on the Board of Directors of the Salem Museum & Historical Society and the Roanoke Diversity Center. Samantha is a committed queer, feminist, and anti-racist activist and community organizer. They are particularly passionate about mentoring young queer and trans people in Southwest Virginia.   

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Gregory Samantha Rosenthal (they/them or she/her) is Associate Professor of History and Coordinator of the Public History Concentration at Roanoke College in Salem, Virginia. She is the author of two books, Beyond Hawaiʻi: Native Labor in the Pacific World, and the forthcoming Living Queer History: Remembrance and Belonging in a Southern City. They are co-founder of the Southwest Virginia LGBTQ+ History Project, a nationally recognized queer public history initiative. Her work has received awards and recognition from the National Council on Public History, the Committee on LGBT History, the American Society for Environmental History, and the Working Class Studies Association. 

Headshots